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Historic PreservationLocal LandmarksResidential Sites

Historic Preservation
423 West Ferguson
Tyler, TX, 75702
Phone: (903) 531-1175
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Residential Sites

3. RAMSOUR HOUSE

Built circa 1862
504 E. Charnwood Street
National Register of Historic Places

Early pioneer Andrew Hosea Ramsour operated the first flour and grist mill in Tyler. He acquired land in 1861 on which he built a home for his wife and six children. The original house was of the “dog trot” style, with kitchen and bedrooms separated by an open hall. The foundation was constructed from tree trunks cut from the immediate vicinity and the entire structure was built with very few nails. Two fireplaces remain as well as five original doors that show hand hewn marks. With additions and remodeling over the years, the house now has a Classic Revival appearance. The distinctive iron fence surrounding this house is one of Tyler’s more recognizable landmarks.

 

5. BONNER-WHITAKER-McCCLENDON HOUSE

Built in 1878
806 W. Houston Street
National Register of Historic Places
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark

Built for Harrison and Martha Bonner (Mattie), this home was remarkably self-sufficient with its own gasification power plant. The original grounds encompassed more than two hundred acres, which included a grass tennis court on the south lawn. In 1907, the home was bought by Mattie’s sister, Annie Bonner, and her husband, S.S. McClendon. The home remained in the McClendon family until 1981, when the property was deeded to the Bonner-Whitaker-McClendon House Society. Since then, extensive renovation has been undertaken on the Eastlake Bracketed Victorian structure and surrounding lawn. The house is open to the public for tours and social and civic functions. It is the birthplace of Washington news correspondent Sarah McClendon.
 

9. RAMEY-GRAINGER HOUSE

Built in 1903
605 S. Broadway Avenue
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark
National Register of Historic Places

Mr. Thomas Brown Ramey established his jewelry business on the downtown square around 1875. He and his wife were well known for their civic activities and public commitment. In the 1890’s they purchased the property at 605 S. Broadway and completed construction of this home in 1903. The floor plan and architecture are prime examples of the Georgian style. The Rameys had two children and their son, Judge Thomas B. Ramey, became a prominent leader in the field of education. The home was occupied by the Ramey family until 1980, when the law firm of Grainger-Price bought and restored it to its original architectural splendor with adaptive re-use as a law office.
 

11. GOODMAN-LeGRAND HOUSE

Built in 1859
624 N. Broadway Avenue
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark
National Register of Historic Places

One of Tyler’s most recognized landmarks is the Goodman-LeGrand home. In 1859, Captain Samuel Smith began construction of a one story, four room house. He sold his “Bonnie Castle” just before leaving for service in the Confederate Army. Later, in 1866, the home was sold to Dr. Samuel A. Goodman for his son, Dr. William J. Goodman. Through numerous enlargements and renovations, the present Classical Revival style was completed in 1926. The home remained in the Goodman family until the death of Mrs. Sally Goodman LeGrand in 1939. She bequeathed the home to the City of Tyler. In 1998-99, the City did extensive renovations and today it is open for public tours and as a meeting place, with original furnishings of the Goodman family remaining throughout the house.
 

14. PATTERSON HOUSE

Built before 1854
1311 W. Oakwood Street
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark

The original owner of this property was John Lollar, one of the men commissioned to select the town site for Tyler in 1845. Lollar acquired the land from Governor Henderson in 1846 under a land grant provision decreed during the Texas Republic years. In 1854 he sold his home to Dr. James C. Moore and in 1871, it was bought by John M. Patterson and remained in the Patterson family until 1964. In 1882, the home was remodeled to its present Queen Anne style with additional modifications made by subsequent owners.
 

15. WOLDERT HOUSE

Built in 1906
604 Woldert Street

John G. Woldert, a German immigrant, came to Texas in 1839. He prospered in business and eventually moved to Tyler where he built a home on this site between 1854 and 1865. He had two daughters and five sons, one of whom was Alexander, the founder of Woldert Canning Company and Woldert Peanut Products. Alexander built this three story Classic Prairie style home during the years of 1898-1906. Interesting features include stained glass windows, steam heating through a boiler in the basement and a copper voice tube that connected the kitchen to Mr. Woldert’s room. In 1983, the home was sold to Charles Clark, who renovated the building for adaptive re-use as legal offices.
 

16. BARTON-VANDERPOOL HOUSE

Built circa 1930
440 S. Vine Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

The Barton-Vanderpool House is architecturally a Classic English Tudor. The exterior is a rustic masonry with herringbone bond brick and large volcanic or pumice stones set in the masonry. The second story is designated with a half timbered effect. The property was owned by the J.W. Bartons, who sold it to J.C. Hawkins in 1934. In 1945, it became the property of Milton R. Vanderpool, owner of the Ideal Baking Company of Tyler, who resided there until 1961. In recent years, the Vine Street area has seen activity in the adaptive reuse of older homes to commercial and office space.
 

17. McCORD-BLACKWELL HOUSE

Built circa 1884
1320 N. Bois D’Arc Avenue

This three story Queen Anne house is one of the oldest in Tyler and was the home of Felix J. and Gabinella McCord in 1895. Felix McCord served as State District Judge of the Seventh Judicial District Court from 1884 until 1896. In 1922, the home was sold to Mr. and Mrs. James T. Blackwell. Blackwell was an engineer with the Cotton Belt Railroad since 1904. In 1965, he sold the property and it was used as a multi-family rental dwelling until it was severely damaged by a fire in 1984. The home was restored in 1985 and today it serves as a private residence.
 

18. LITTLEJOHN HOUSE

Built circa 1911
313 E. Charnwood Street
National Register of Historic Places

Samual W. and Anna Ray Beall Littlejohn built this house about 1911 so their four daughters could attend Tyler schools. Their father, manager of Chronister Lumber Company in Cherokee County, continued to commute to the mill by train. Originally, it was a frame house with a porch roof on two sides at the first story level. After a 1913 fire, the house was rebuilt and later, in 1930, remodeled to its present Southern Colonial style. In place of the old porch roof, two story columns were added and the exterior bricked. Many features still retained date back to the original house, among them pocket French style doors and curly pine woodwork collected and milled especially for this house from locally grown timber. The house remained in the Littlejohn family until the death of youngest daughter Mildred in 1983. It changed hands several times and currently is a law office.
 

20. BONNER HOUSE

Built circa 1888
625 S. Vine Avenue

Originally a two story dwelling, this house was built in the Queen Anne Victorian era in the Classical Free Style about 1888 by attorney John T. Bonner on the former homestead of his father T.R. Bonner, Speaker of the Texas Legislature and community leader. In 1926, the upper story caught fire as the result of an electrical malfunction and the house was reconstructed as a single story structure. Among its many significant features are a traditional Queen Anne turret, curved glass windows, and stained glass windows. The house was restored in 1989.
 

21. CONNALLY-MUSSELMAN HOUSE

Built circa 1904
700 S. Broadway Avenue
Recorded Texas Historic Landmark
National Register of Historic Places

Walter Connally, a successful Tyler businessman, built this gracious house for his family between 1904 and 1908. He employed Dallas architects Hubbell and Green and is remembered for his meticulous recording of costs associated with this construction project. Solid horizontal lines of the house are reminiscent of the square, Italianate Style, but some of “Texas Prairie” is also evident. Contemporary status symbols – thick leaded windows, beveled glass, stained glass windows – are used throughout the house. The interior is greatly influenced by the Craftsman style with wide use of exposed oak and birch and a variety of styles in fireplace mantels. The house remained a Connally home for three generations until 1978, when it was purchased by the current family.
 

23. FLORENCE HOUSE

Built in 1911
700 N. Moore Avenue

Architect J.H. Bothwell built this Georgian style residence in 1911 for Edward Everett Florence and Blanche Bailiff Florence. It was a seven room cottage with front and rear galleries, gable roof and brick chimneys. Later the property was sold to the Rev. E.E. Cleveland, Jr. and Martha Josephine Cleveland and served as a prayer sanctuary until the owners decided to leave Tyler. In 1977, the Tyler Alumnae Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority purchased the house to serve as sorority headquarters.
 

27. WOLDERT-SPENCE-HEATON MANOR

Built circa 1884
611 W. Woldert Street

John George Woldert married Alma Edilina Richter, both originally from Saxony, in 1850.
They moved to East Texas in 1859 and raised a large family. Woldert purchased the residence that later became this stately home. It is likely that two small houses were located on this site, in the dog-trot style, and in early 1884 consolidated into one single story structure. Between 1910 and 1918, the house underwent a major remodeling that added a second story when granddaughter Alma Mary came here to live with her new husband, Robert Spence. He became Mayor of Tyler and she a poet, and they remained part of the city’s life for many years. After his death in 1965, a decade later than hers, the house became rental property and was eventually sold in the early 1980’s. The Queen Anne Victorian house had declined considerably by the time Patricia and Richard Heaton purchased it in 1992 for restoration as a bed and breakfast.
 

28. BIRDSONG HOUSE

Built in 1931
518 W. Mockingbird Lane
National Register of Historic Places

Fred and Mae Birdsong came to their new house on Mockingbird Lane in 1931 with three daughters. Mrs. Birdsong knew much about beauty. She was a charter member of the Rose City Garden Club, wrote a book about wildflowers, and created a beautiful garden of camellias and azaleas where tea parties were popular. In 1957, the family remodeled the house, enclosing a side porch, eliminating grillwork on the front porch and adding a bathroom. After Mr. Birdsong’s death the house was sold to Dr. J. Paxton Hart and Jean E. Hart, who resided there from the 1970’s until 1991. The home remains a private residence.
 

30. THE MORRELL-PINKERTON HOME

Built in 1863
415 E. Charnwood
National Register of Historic Places

The Morrell-Pinkerton Home was built by D.B. and Laura Morrell in 1863. The structure is representative of the American Victorian building boom of the late 1800s. It embodies characteristics of a simple Queen Anne style, including asymmetrical porches, high pitched gables, and fish scale shingles, which were typical of East Texas homes during the mid to late 1800s. Among the more than 10 owners over its 133 year lifetime were such prominent leaders as Judge S.A. Lindsey and the Gus Pinkerton family. The E. Littlejohn family rented this home while awaiting the building of their larger residence further up Charnwood. The house has remained in remarkably unchanged and original condition with restoration efforts completed.
 

31. WILLETT-BRYANT HOME

Built in 1932
621 S. Fannin
National Register of Historic Homes

The Willett-Bryant House is a wood frame (clapboard) structure that is categorized as Early Classical Revival. It utilizes elements from the Georgian, Federal, and Greek Revival periods with the columns supporting the full facade porch and the dentil molding being dominant features. The home was built by Bob Collins for Mrs. Willett in 1932 when building in most parts of the country was limited by the Great Depression. Mr. & Mrs. L.E. Bryant owned the home from 1938 to 1993, when they moved to Tyler to establish Barqs Bottling Company. Mr. Bryant served as a Director of Peoples National Bank for 50 years. The current owners are descendants of the Bryants.
 

32. SALEH-WITT HOME

Built in 1931
1208 S. College Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

The Saleh-Witt House is a stucco structure which is categorized as Spanish Colonial Revival. The home was built by Hobart Plunkett for newlyweds George and Rose Saleh in 1931. The Saleh family was longtime candy merchants and tobacco merchants in Tyler who are still actively contributing to the community. It is said that this house was one of the first built in Tyler in the Spanish Colonial style, which was so popular in California. The home was owned by John and Willie Witt from 1950-1969. Mr. Witt is remembered by many as “Doc”, director of the municipal and school bands. Music lessons were often taught in the sunroom (study) of this home.
 

33. FAIR HOME

Built 1927
1505 S. Robertson

The R.W. Fair house was originally built at 905 S. Chilton in 1927. The eclectic brick structure was the first home built by R.W. Fair at this location. The Fair’s early family life was spent in this home when their sons Wilton and James were young children. R.W. Fair was one of the leading citizens of Tyler and a primary force in the development of the city in this century. In 1937, in order to build a larger residence, the house was sold and moved six blocks away to 1505 S. Robertson, where it is presently located.
 

36. MATHIS-ALBERTSON HOME

Built 1888
823 S. Palace Avenue

The Mathis-Albertson Home is a wood frame home which was built by J.M. Mathis in 1888. A carpenter/builder by trade, Mr. Mathis worked on such well-known homes and buildings as Marvin Methodist Church and the Goodman Home. In 1931, the home became the residence of his daughter and son-in-law, Hattie Earle and Otto James Albertson. Otto Albertson was Chairman of the Smith County Road Commission, a member of Tyler City Commission (now known as the City Council), and a member of the Administrative Board of Marvin Methodist Church for over 60 years. He owned a business, E. Albertson Sons, on the downtown square. His father, Elif Albertson, owned the first Opera House in Tyler. The Albertson’s daughter, Dorothy Earle Albertson, lived in the house until 1996. The home is an excellent example of Queen Anne architectural style with its asymmetrical designs, fish scale shingle siding, and porches decorated with fancy “gingerbread” posts and balusters.
 

37. LINDSEY-OWENS HOME

Built 1926
902 S. College Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

The Lindsey-Owens Home was built in 1926 as a classic American “cottage” style house with the entrance being typical of the Greek Revival Architecture used during the 1920s to enhance the home’s appearance. Judge Sam A. Lindsey purchased the entire block of land in 1914, building this house for his two sisters-in-law in the 1920s and donating the northeast portion of the block for the Tyler Woman’s Building in 1931. Mr. and Mrs. (C. B.) Jack Owens, for whom Owentown was named, were owners of the home from 1944-60. This home sits in the heart of the Azalea District, a site from which many of the gardens can be viewed. The house and surrounding area also feature historically significant WPA drainage projects.
 

38. POLLARD HOME

Built in 1935
801 Troup Highway

Texas State Senator Thomas G. and Edna Pollard built the two-story brick home in 1935. Architect Shirley Simons, Sr. designed the house in the Georgian style and gave it his signature round window above the front door. He also added stars above the front door and over the drawing room mantel, which indicated that it was the home of a State Senator. He initiated laws during the oil boom which still regulate and control the oil industry in East Texas today. Edna Pollard wrote and published a book about his life entitled “The Man From Edom”. Landscape architect Maurice Shamburger, early pioneer in the use of azaleas in Tyler, designed the formal gardens which have been recognized by the Smithsonian.
 

39. WITHERUP HOME

Built in 1932
212 West Dobbs Street
National Register of Historic Places

Marian L. Witherup built the masonry structure in 1932. Architecturally, it is a combination English Country with English Tudor influence. Well-known Tyler architect Shirley Simons, Sr., used rough timbers among the brick to give the two story structure its unique Elizabethan Revival style. The house sits on the property, which was originally owned by Judge Lindsey, a portion of which was donated for the Woman’s Building. Running through the property is the historically significant WPA drainage project, masonry walls, a stone-lined well, and beautiful azalea gardens. It sits in the heart of the Azalea District.
 

40. BOREN HOME

Built in 1908
806 S. Broadway Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

This Craftman style Bungalow was built in 1908. John Parker and Walter Connally remodeled an older home in celebration of the marriage of Mr. Parker’s daughter, Bettie, to Mr. Connally’s nephew, Oswald Mac Boren. Mrs. Gretta Brokaw Connally and Oswald Boren’s mother, Bertha Brokaw Boren, were sisters. Mr. Boren was in the abstract business and during the East Texas oil boom he became very successful, at which time he built a much larger brick home at 720 S. Broadway. In 1934, Louise, their only daughter, became the second Tyler Rose Queen and the first Tyler native to reign over the Tyler Rose Festival. It was here that the first Queen’s Tea was held.
 

41. LINDSEY HOME

Built in 1895
416 East Charnwood
National Register of Historic Places

This modest Queen Anne wood frame home was built in 1895. The house was the first home of Judge Samuel A. Lindsey, a very prominent Tyler citizen. He was a teacher, lawyer, and catalyst for the birth of Gulf States Telephone Company. Judge Lindsey served one term in the Texas legislature, was a Smith County Judge, and served as chairman of People’s Bank. He owned the land where the Woman’s Building was constructed and donated that land for its construction. Therese Lindsey, his wife, was a poet and instrumental in establishing the Poetry Society of Texas.
 

43. JAMES HOME

Built in 1940
322 West Fifth Street
National Register of Historic Places

Built by Louis and Clara James in 1940, Mrs. James was proud of the fact that she designed the home. Mr. James was an oil and gas attorney who was active in the Smith County Bar Association. The house is a masonry, two story, Classical Revival style structure with Greek Revival influences. The front entry, which faces Fifth Street, is dominated by the portico that is supported by four classic columns. The paneled door with the elliptical fan and sidelights are representative of the details in the grand homes being built in the Azalea District during this period.
 

44. SMITH-BUTLER HOUSE

Built in 1890
419 W. Houston Street
National Register of Historic Places

Rev. Thomas P. Smith built this Queen Anne style home in 1890. He was the son of Dr. L.W. Smith, a noted physician serving as a surgeon in the Confederate Army in Tyler. Rev. Smith married Mary Bell Long, the daughter of Captain Richard B. Long of the Confederate Army-the Texas Infantry. Rev. Smith was a prominent minister of the Methodist Church. He and his wife had no children of their own but raised several orphan children, giving them the advantages of a Christian upbringing and education in their home. Rev. Smith died in Marshall, Texas, on February 14, 1900. Mrs. Smith lived in the house until 1904, when she sold it to Judge Roy Butler. Judge Butler and his wife raised their two daughters in the house.
 

45. CHILDERS HOUSE

Built in 1929
625 W. Dobbs Street
National Register of Historic Places

Only three owners have lived in this house built in 1929. Albert Childers built the house for $6,000 as a wedding present for his wife, Lucille. She resided in the home for 66 years until she sold it in 1995. It sold again in 1999. The house has been described as one of the best examples of Spanish Colonial Revival architecture found outside the state of California.
 

46. FITZGERALD HOUSE

Built in 1898
815 S. Broadway Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

The Fitzgerald House was occupied by three generations of the same family for nearly a century. It was originally constructed in 1898 for the family of Henry B. Marsh. After living in the house for a few years, the Marsh family sold the house to Mr. Marsh’s law partner, Judge J.W. Fitzgerald and his wife, Mary. In 1999, the Fitzgerald’s granddaughter sold it to Robert Wangner, a developer in Tyler. The home was in great disrepair, but Mr. & Mrs. Wangner restored the property over a two year period, incorporating much of the Fitzgerald memorabilia. The house contains three offices, including the headquarters for Historic Tyler, Inc.
 

48. CAMPBELL-RICHARDSON HOUSE

Built in 1928
922 South College
National Register of Historic Places

This Tudor Revival-style home was built in 1928 by Allen Campbell, a prominent Tyler contractor. The Campbell family resided in the home for 22 years. Will Mann Richardson, a prominent Tyler attorney, purchased the home in 1950. It remained in the Richardson family for 53 years until in 2003. Running through the property is the historically significant WPA drainage project, masonry walls, a stone-lined well, and beautiful azalea gardens. It sits in the heart of the Azalea District.
 

49. VIRGINIA AND R.K. BONNER HOUSE

Built in 1902
826 South Robertson
National Register of Historic Places

This modified L-Plan home, built in 1902, has a square or rectangular central mass with projecting front and side wings that distinguish it from the simpler L-Plan. A hipped roof covers the primary structure and heightens the low, one story profile. The Bonner House displays classical Revival Style elements in the form of porch posts and wood trim, and is among 86 examples of this plan type in Tyler.
 

50. ROY G. ROBERTSON FARMHOUSE

Built in 1894
204 Lindsey Lane
National Register of Historic Places

This Prairie Style, wood frame house was built in 1894. In the early 1890s, John and Sarah Robertson conveyed 14 acres of their cotton farm to their son, Roy G. Robertson. Shortly thereafter, Roy secured a mortgage of $1,000.00 from East Texas Loan & Savings Association of Tyler to build the farmhouse. The original farmhouse was architecturally a “box house”, meaning the frame of the house was constructed out of solid sheets of pine. The recessed front door frame and window frames throughout the front of the house are indicative of the old “solid box” houses.
 

51. ULMER HOUSE

Built in 1934
1608 S. Chilton Avenue
National Register of Historic Places

The interior of the modified Georgian home has a contemporary look, featuring strong solid colors, tile and wood floors. Other features include a carved oak fireplace mantle, crown moldings in all of the rooms, and two pairs of 18th century French doors. The house was built in 1934 and was sold a year later to Dr. James G. Ulmer, minister of the First Christian Church at Broadway Avenue and Front Street. He was also executive manager of East Texas Broadcasting Co. and taught at Tyler Commercial College. The Ulmers sold the house to Rudolph and Elaine Tastch in 1967. Mr.Tastch was minister of the Ridgeway Christian Church near the TJC campus. Mrs. Tastch was the first dyslexia teacher in Tyler and taught reading to children in the breakfast room. Only four families have lived in this home.
 

52. HANSON-COOPER HOUSE

Built in 1885
412 E. Charnwood

The Tudor Revival style home is one of twelve revival style two-story duplexes within the Charnwood Historic District that has the character of a single family residence. The home shares family ties, as well as proximity, with its eastern neighbor at 416 E. Charnwood. In 1885, Samuel A. Lindsey, an attorney who later became a local judge and prominent Tyler businessman, developed the property at 416 E. Charnwood with a one story Classical Revival style home. He sold the property to Ida Spain in 1904. The property passed from Ida Spain to Josephine E. Hanson in 1908. Mrs. Hanson lived in the house for many years. In 1930, Mrs. Hanson subdivided a portion of her property to the west to create a lot for her daughters. A house was designed by Shirley Simons and constructed in 1931. The upper unit served as an income generator, serving as a temporary home to 25 different renters. One resident was Curtis Sanford, an oilman and founder and first underwriter of the Cotton Bowl Game. In 1964, the home was sold to Amanda Pearson Graham for $8,071.00. Upon her death in 1982, the property passed to her daughter, Elsie Pearson Hamilton, who lived in the home until 1984, when it was sold to Melba R. and Luke Medford III for $75,000. Mrs. Medford planned to use the property for her interior decorating business and an antique store and made many improvements to the home. She was unable to secure commercial zoning for the endeavor and sold the property in 1984 to Allen and Kimberly Tennison, who lived in the house until July, 1994. In August, 1994, Fran and Curtis Cooper purchased the residence and added a new roof, new plumbing, three antique English stained glass windows, and new beams with subfloors in the bathrooms. They also refinished the original oak floors and removed plywood from six exterior windows and four exterior porch arches.
 

53. MCKINNEY HOUSE

Built in 1931
1503 South College Avenue

The two-story, red-tile roofed, brick veneer Mediterranean Revival style structure features an asymmetrical façade with offset projecting entry bay, 4/4 double hung wood sash windows, exterior chimney with decorative stack, and a loggia-like bank of five arched windows separated by narrow serpentine columns. The entry is recessed in the projecting bay detailed with an arched opening, serpentine columns, and glass and metal lanterns. The two-story brick veneer garage apartment at the rear of the property complements the house. The house was designed by Edward A. Nolan and built by H.W. McCord. The McKinney House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 

54. WHITE HOUSE

Built in 1929
116 Lindsey Lane

The Tudor Revival-style home, commonly known as The Castle, was built by Hugh White, a leading builder of his day. The brick and stucco house features a turret with balcony, weathervane and chimney pots. The home was the site of many social events and was the beginning of the Azalea Trail. The current owner is in the process of being listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 

55. THOMAS JEFFERSON, SR. AND ANNIE MAE GIVENS HOUSE

Built in 1931
2209 N. Grand Street

Thomas Jefferson Givens, Sr. built this American Cottage style home during the oil boom for his wife and son, who wanted to be near Texas College. Mrs. Givens provided housing for many young ladies attending the college, including her own granddaughter. Four generations of the Givens family have lived in the home.
 

65. Chilton-Taylor House

Built in 1888
727 South Chilton Ave.

In 1888 Horace Chilton, the first native born Texas U.S. Senator, built the home on what was known then as Mary Street. Architecturally, the house has been described as Greek Revival, its large Corinthian columns surround the house and the porches are carved wood, topped with intricate metal trim. A cantilevered balcony stretches around three sides of the home and is one of the more striking features of the home. Horace Chilton’s family lived in the home until 1902. There were several different owners from 1902 until Gus Taylor purchased the home in 1910; the Taylor family lived in the home for 45 years. Gus Taylor, president of the newly formed Citizens National Bank, was a very active civic and business leader in the community. In January, 2005, John and Ellen Musselman purchased the property. Today, the home is used for their business, Southwest Operating Inc. and Atlantis Oil Company. Click HERE to watch a video of the wonderful treasures discovered inside the home. 

 

66. Bradford House

Built in 1938
2015 South College Ave.

In 1934 a young doctor, Sidney Bradford and his wife, Goldie, traveled to Chicago to visit the World’s Fair that was know as “A Century of Progress”. While there they found the plans for their dream home. The British Colonial home, which featured all the latest technology, was sponsored by Marshall Fields Department Store and was used to showcase their furniture. Upon returning to Tyler, the couple began to construct their home, with the help of local architects, Gregory and Cates. Maurice Shamburger did the original landscape design. Mrs. Bradford, who was an avid gardener, continued to live in the home until shortly before her death in 1999. In 2000, Casey and Kelley Brownlow purchased the home and are diligently working together to improve the property.

 

68. Haynes-Brinton House

Built in 1935

400 West Third Street


In 1935, Mr. Frank Ses Haynes and his wife, Maude Elizabeth, known as Libba, built the brick, one story American Cottage style home on West Third Street. Ses and Libba were married on April 22, 1923, at the time he was employed at the A.A. Laundry.  After a move to Arlington and Palestine, the Haynes moved back to their beloved Tyler.  In 1929, Ses along with his brother, Joe, went into the dry cleaning business for themselves.  He ran his dry cleaning business at 328 College, until 1946.  It was considered one of the most complete shops in East Texas.  Libba worked for the Tyler Public Library for ten years; she resigned on January 1, 1937, in order to enjoy her new home.  She ended her library career as head librarian and was instrumental in obtaining budget increases for more books and salaries.  The Chairman of the Library Board, Mr. W.S. Hanley, said the following in regards to Libba’s resignation: “under her capable and efficient direction the library service has improved so that the Tyler Public Library is now second to none in the state”.


From 1946 through 1962, Dr. Robert Hill, father to Libba, lived with them in their home.  Dr. Hill was the pastor of the First Presbyterian Church from 1915 to 1946, a total of 31 years.  After retiring from the First Presbyterian Church, he went onto pastor several other churches in Tyler and work tirelessly until his death at the age of 94.  Dr. Hill was known for his generous spirit, his spirituality, and his religious poems.  

 

72. Albert and Lillian Brown House

Built in 1939
209 W. 7th Street

The home built in 1939 for Albert and Lillian Brown is located within the confines of the Azalea National Historic District and is within a few blocks of Berfeld Park and Bergfeld Center both areas of historical importance in Tyler. The home provides a glimpse into the style and scope of residences built in Tyler following the discovery of oil in the East Texas fields, which led to levels of prosperity that far exceeded other areas of the country during the Great Depression.
 

73. Schoenbrun House

Built in 1950
505 W. Third Street

Mano Scheoenbrun born in Slovakia came to Tyler in 1931with his wife Elsie. They established what would become a retail fashion icon for men and women in East Texas, the New York store. In 1950 with their business rapidly expanding they began building this unique u-shaped modern home in a neighborhood of traditional residences. Elsie lived in the home until her passing in 1993. In 2003 the house was included as a Contributing Property in the survey of the Azalea Residential Historic District and subsequently listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 

75. Harber-Finlayson House

Built in 1935
1312 S. Chilton Avenue

The single family residence built in 1935 has an interesting history. Originally, it was built as a duplex. Cecil and Mary Harber were the first owners and lived on the first level while renting out the upper level to the J.A. Finlayson family. In the 1980’s the duplex was converted into a single family residence. Although going through extensive renovations and additions current owners Jerry and Victoria Ashworth have taken great care to ensure the home retains its original façade from the street view.
 

76. Page-Patterson House

Built in 1931
210 Mockingbird Lane

The Tudor Revival cottage-style home was built in 1931 by Dr. Roy L. Page. The local physician and his wife Carrie lived in the home for only a short time. In 2007 new owners Mike and Penny Patterson started a major renovation all the while making sure to retain the original architectural and period features of the home such as the stained glass doors.
 

77. Allen-Wiley House

Built in 1935
1615 S. Chilton Avenue

Located just south of the Brick Street area, this Azalea District this Tyler home was built for the Richard Allen family. Mr. Allen worked as the Chief Dispatcher for the Cotton Belt Railway which played a pivotal role in the economic boom of East Texas. Much care has been taken by the present owners Barbara and Worth Holmes to maintain the homes integrity.
 

78. Swann-Bass House

Built in 1931
215 West Second Street

E.W. and Ruth Swann received the plans for their house on April 1, 1931 from the architect Bryan and Sharp of Dallas, TX. The house was completed later that year at a cost of $15,000.00. Mr. Swann owned Swann Furniture Company and was a land developer. Ruth Swann was a founding member of the Tyler Garden Club and the Junior League of Tyler, early meetings were held in this house. During the 1930’s the Rose Festival Queen’s tea was held in the side yard. The house was purchased by Judge Bill and Patsy Bass in 1986. The home was restored to its original condition with no alterations of the structure.
 

79. Cochran-Ramey House

Built in 1937
1816 South College Avenue

The house was built by a well-known Tyler oilman, S.A. Cochran during, the oil boom. The architect that designed the house is Shirley Simons who built many of the first homes in the Azalea Historic District. The home is now owned by Tom and Gin Ramey who have gone to great lengths to preserve the home.
 

80. Azalea Cottage

Built in 1960
551 Park Heights Circle

Wayne J. Smith and wife Elise had the home built in 1960 by Hobart Plunkett who is well known as the builder of the Saleh-Witt house. Wayne Smith was a pilot and Elsie owned local retail store. Since 1993 the cottage has served as the family home of Dr. Charles W. Alworth and his wife Madeline. Now dubbed the “Azalea Cottage”, the home has been extensively renovated while maintaining the original structure and style inside and outside of the home.
 

81. Spence-Bertram House

Built in 1936
418 West Eighth Street

Built in 1936 by Mr. and Mrs. Zack Brooks, this home was bought in 1945 by Louise A. Grelling. Eleven years later Mr. Grelling's daughter and her husband, Mary John and Ralph Spence, took occupancy.
Several additions and conversions have taken place over the years to accommodate a growing family. Today, 418 West Eighth is the home of Mr. and Mrs. Harold Bertram. The home has been tastefully restored while maintaining its original ambiance. This stately Normandy style home continues to serve the tradition of family warmth and Southern hospitality.
 

82. Lucas-Findley House

Built in 1956
2217 South Chilton Avenue

Baker Lucas was a successful real estate developer and businessman that later became Mayor of Tyler. At the pinnacle of his success he built this home patterned after the grand plantation homes of the south for his wife Bette who grew up in South Carolina This Tara-like mansion has been restored to its original grandeur by Annette and Ken Findley since their purchase of the estate in 1990.
 

83. Burke-Heines House

Built in 1935
1616 South Chilton Avenue

In 1935 John Burke who was the President of the American Laundry Co., and his wife Nettie built this Tudor Revival style home. Members of the Burke family lived in this home for 70 years until 2005. Michelle and Martin Heines Purchased the home in 2005 and began remodeling the home while maintaining the original architectural features
 

84. Sol & Jen Katz House

Built in 1927
1321 South College Avenue

The Mediterranean/Tudor Revival style structure, built in 1927, was designed by Shirley Simons, Sr. and is a contributing property to the Azalea National Historic District. The palladium style steel casement windows were among the first in the Tyler area. A sunroom was added in the 1960’s and several indoor updates and renovations have been made in recent years.

 

86. Walker-Skorkowsky House

Built in 1949
1619 South College Avenue

Recently widowed Mary Manziel had this home commissioned and built for her in 1949. She enlisted the help of local builder Elmer Sharp to build the Austin stone Colonial Revival house. After living there for a short time Mary decided the house was too large for one person and relocated to a smaller residence. In August 1951 J.G. and Curtis Walker bought the house and raised their family there. When Mrs. Walker moved in 2008 the home was purchased by Bob and Sherry Skorkowsky. Since then the Skorkowsky family has renovated the home while preserving many of its original fixtures.
 

88. Tunnell-Robinson House

Built in 1930
206 West Mockingbird Lane

Mr. Tunnell a real estate and oil tycoon built this home in 1930 for his wife Lora and their five children.
Current owner Ray Robinson has renovated the home while keeping its original integrity. Despite the passing years, the beautiful features of this home remain. The house “served us well’ recalls Mrs. Eva Tunnell Clyde whose Mockingbird memories are many, having lived most of her life on this street.
 

89. Whitney-Farrell House

Built in 1931
201 West Rusk Street

This Tudor Revival house was built in 1931 by W.M. Ledbetter and R.L. Clanahan. The first owners of the home were Raymond Lee Whitney and his wife Mamie Louise Whitney. Mamie lived in the home for 62 years until 1993. Robin and Kim Farrell purchased the home in 2009 and is currently being used as offices for Robin Farrell Insurance.
 

90. Brown-Shaw House

Built in 1942
223 East Second Street

Glynne Brown a local surgeon and his wife Evelyn were the first owners of this address in 1942. Evelyn lived in the house until the early 1960's. M.H. and Gladys Shaw were the owners by 1962. Mr. Shaw was an independent oil man. Gladys Shaw is well-remembered as owner for two decades of the popular Glass Owl Antiques located on Vine Street. The carriage lights at the front entrance of her former home were installed by Mrs. Shaw. The Shorts purchased the property in 2009 and have updated the house to suit their needs. Defining architectural elements of the Brown-Short house are the intersecting gables, pedimented entrance and end wall chimneys.
 

91. Robinson-Perry House

Built in 1936
1501 South Wall Avenue

This cottage was built in 1936 by Howard W. Robinson and wife Mary Jean in what was the J. L. Bergfeld Subdivision. Mr. Robinson was a department manager for the Mayer & Schmidt Department Store and later became an oil operator in 1945. William B. Olmstead and wife, Anne, bought the home in 1954. They were the owners of Olmstead's Shoe Store on the downtown square
and lived in the house until 1961. In 1994 Harvianna Perry purchased the home and began a extensive renovation.

 

92. Oden-Broussard House

Built in 1928
207-209 West Rusk Street

John T. and Lois P. Oden were the original owners of the house. Mrs. Oden was a Career teacher at Tyler High School. The house has been the residence of various choir directors of First Presbyterian Church, located just across the street. The home was one of the largest residences, a typical two-story with symmetrical front façade, at the Rusk Street and College Avenue intersection and a staple of that neighborhood. Innovative interior woodwork and cabinetry remains in the homes. Current owner Alton Broussard II has maintained the original exterior while updating various interior aspects.

 

97. Douglas-Holland-Pollard House

Built in 1873

318 S. Fannin Avenue

 

This was the home of John B. Douglas a Civil War veteran, merchant and city official, and his wife Ketura Walker Douglas, a local church and civic leader. The area around this site was an upper-middle class residential neighborhood just outside the original town plat. The high Victorian wood frame edifice was probably erected as a 2-story building with a 3-story tower. The family modified the house in stages. The John B. and Ketura Douglas house is the only identified extant example of high Victorian residential design in Tyler to combine Italianate and Second Empire style details.

 

98. Rowland-Swann House

Built in 1937

141 Rowland Place

Carrie Rowland Swann (daughter of B.W. Rowland) and her husband Thomas E. Swann hired contractor and builder John A. Williams to construct the home in 1937. The origninal cost to build the home was $6,000. The home is part of what must have been one of the first subdivisions in Tyler. Carrie Rowland sub-divided her father's lot that ran from Charnwood to Dobbs east of Broadway and platted "The Rowland Place" in 1925. The home is a representative of Colonial Revival architecture. The home was built in a neighborhood that became known as "Honeymoon Row" as many newly-wedded couples were moving in and raising families in the area in the 1930s. The original developer, T.E. Swann, is also known as the founder of Swann's Furniture. He and his wife were both well-known and involved in Tyler in the early 1900s.

 

100. Hillsman-Edson-Wiley House

Built in 1890

627 South Fannin Avenue

The two story single family residential home representing the Classic Revival style.  The home was built in 1890 by Mr. and Mrs. L.J. Hillsman on a lot which was part of the Old Charnwood School property.  The property was among the first developed on South Fannin (Fannie) Avenue in the new Charnwood Addition. In 1891 the home was sold to J.A. Edson, General Superintendent of the Cotton Belt Railway. His railway connection accounts for the curly pine accents in the home, which otherwise would have been difficult to bring to Tyler. Walter Wiley moved into the house in 1931. He was a hardware merchant and president of the East Texas Crate and Basket Company. The home has had minor alterations, none that compromise the integrity of the home’s character.

 
 
Built in 1938
2015 South College Ave.

In 1934 a young doctor, Sidney Bradford and his wife, Goldie, traveled to Chicago to visit the World’s Fair that was know as “A Century of Progress”. While there they found the plans for their dream home. The British Colonial home, which featured all the latest technology, was sponsored by Marshall Fields Department Store and was used to showcase their furniture. Upon returning to Tyler, the couple began to construct their home, with the help of local architects, Gregory and Cates. Maurice Shamburger did the original landscape design. Mrs. Bradford, who was an avid gardener, continued to live in the home until shortly before her death in 1999. In 2000, Casey and Kelley Brownlow purchased the home and are diligently working together to improve the property.
Built in 1938
2015 South College Ave.

In 1934 a young doctor, Sidney Bradford and his wife, Goldie, traveled to Chicago to visit the World’s Fair that was know as “A Century of Progress”. While there they found the plans for their dream home. The British Colonial home, which featured all the latest technology, was sponsored by Marshall Fields Department Store and was used to showcase their furniture. Upon returning to Tyler, the couple began to construct their home, with the help of local architects, Gregory and Cates. Maurice Shamburger did the original landscape design. Mrs. Bradford, who was an avid gardener, continued to live in the home until shortly before her death in 1999. In 2000, Casey and Kelley Brownlow purchased the home and are diligently working together to improve the property.
Built in 1938
2015 South College Ave.

In 1934 a young doctor, Sidney Bradford and his wife, Goldie, traveled to Chicago to visit the World’s Fair that was know as “A Century of Progress”. While there they found the plans for their dream home. The British Colonial home, which featured all the latest technology, was sponsored by Marshall Fields Department Store and was used to showcase their furniture. Upon returning to Tyler, the couple began to construct their home, with the help of local architects, Gregory and Cates. Maurice Shamburger did the original landscape design. Mrs. Bradford, who was an avid gardener, continued to live in the home until shortly before her death in 1999. In 2000, Casey and Kelley Brownlow purchased the home and are diligently working together to improve the property.
Built in 1938
2015 South College Ave.

In 1934 a young doctor, Sidney Bradford and his wife, Goldie, traveled to Chicago to visit the World’s Fair that was know as “A Century of Progress”. While there they found the plans for their dream home. The British Colonial home, which featured all the latest technology, was sponsored by Marshall Fields Department Store and was used to showcase their furniture. Upon returning to Tyler, the couple began to construct their home, with the help of local architects, Gregory and Cates. Maurice Shamburger did the original landscape design. Mrs. Bradford, who was an avid gardener, continued to live in the home until shortly before her death in 1999. In 2000, Casey and Kelley Brownlow purchased the home and are diligently working together to improve the property.
 
Copyright 2017 by City of Tyler