Search

Historic PreservationNational DistrictsNational Districts List

Historic Preservation
423 West Ferguson
Tyler, TX, 75702
Phone: (903) 531-1175
M-F 8 A.M. to 5 P.M.
Send E-Mail


National Districts

Charnwood Residential Historic District

Atop a gently sloping hill approximately mile south of Tylers original town square, the L-shaped, 12 block Charnwood Residential Historic District includes a variety of large and small late 19th and early 20th century residences. The districts visual and historical focal point is Charnwood Street where expansive residences built for Tylers elite are clustered, and where a few modest pioneer cabins from the early 1860s are now contained within existing dwellings. The Charnwood Residential Historic District was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1999and was the first neighborhood in Tyler to be honored with National Register status. The district consist of approximately 125 structures built from the 1860s to the 1940s and represents one of the largest and best preserved concentrations of historic homes in Tyler. Click here to view the nomination. 

Connally-Musselman House

700 South Broadway (Private Residence). Tyler merchant and former Confederate surgeon Dr. Walter Connally built this striking eclectic combination of Italianate and "Texas Prairie" style between 1906 and 1908. The spacious yard is traversed by brick walks, shaded by a variety of beautiful trees, and is surrounded by the original cast iron fence.

Ramsour House

504 East Charnwood (Private Residence).

Built by Andrew Hosea Ramsour just prior to the Civil War, the Ramsour House is one of the earliest surviving Tyler homes.

Azalea Residential Historic District

Tylers Azalea Residential Historic District was listed in the national register in 2003. The district is Tylers largest historic district and contains 950 single-family residences and 20 duplexes, triplexes and apartment buildings. The district contains he best preserved concentration of early to mid-20th century dwellings in Tyler, and documents eclectic land development patterns and the variety of housing types available to upper and middle income Tyler residents during the 1900 to 1953 period when Tyler experienced intensive growth and became a dominant business, transportation and commercial hub. Many of the homes date from the 1930s and 1940s and were built during Tylers Oil Boom years. Click here to view the nomination!

Birdsong House
518 W. Mockingbird Lane (Private Residence).
Built in 1931 by Fred and Mae Birdsong.

James House
322 W. Fifth Street
Built in 1940 by Louis and Clara James

Short-Line Residential Historic District

Situated in central Tyler, the Short-Line Residential Historic District is approximately five blocks northwest of Tyler’s courthouse square. It encompasses 11 modest, nearly identical dwellings constructed as rental housing for African-American citizens in two phases, one about 1930 and the other about 1935. The Craftsmen style bungalows are good examples of relatively uncommon “row” type housing erected in the 1920’s and 1930’s on large parcels in working class neighborhoods in central and southwest Tyler. After World War II, these dwellings were offered for sale to the families who had rented them for many years. Theses 11 dwellings remain the best-preserved portion of a larger African-American neighborhood. Landscaping in the district includes informal plantings of shrubs and lawn. Concrete walks lead to each front door. The district was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. Click here to view the nomination!

East Ferguson Street Residential Historical District

Situated in central Tyler, the East Ferguson Residential Historic District is approximately three blocks east of Tyler’s courthouse square. It encompasses 6 modest, nearly identical dwellings constructed between 1926 and 1930 on one large parcel of land. All six dwellings are one-story wood frame Craftsmen influenced bungalows built as rental units for working class families. The Craftsmen style bungalows are good examples of relatively uncommon “row” type housing erected in the 1920’s and 1930’s on large parcels in working class neighborhoods in central and southwest Tyler. After World War II, these dwellings were offered for sale to the families who had rented them for many years. Landscaping in the district includes informal plantings of shrubs and lawn. Concrete walks lead to each front door. The district was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. Click here to view the nomination! 

Donnybrook Duplex Residential Historic District

Situated in south central Tyler, the Donnybrook Duplex Residential Historic District is approximately one and one-half miles south of Tyler’s courthouse square. It encompasses 18 duplex dwellings built in 1947 and 1948. All the dwellings are one-story wood frame Colonial Revival/Ranch influenced duplexes built by a local real estate developer, R.J. Henderson. The duplexes are a rare example of duplex development erected in the immediate post-World War II period in Tyler. The duplexes utilize five basic massing forms distinguished by variations in porch and roof design. Materials are buff brick or red brick veneer with wood detailing and the dwellings are distinctive for similar form, embellishment and construction method. Landscaping in the district includes informal plantings of shrubs and lawn. Concrete walks lead to each front door. The district was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. Click here to view the nomination!

Brick Streets Historic District

The Brick Streets Historic District became Tylers sixth historic district in 2004 when it was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The district is about mile south of downtown to the west of Broadway and encompasses 29 blocks and approximately 250 residential, commercial and institutional structures. This neighborhood can be traced to about 1848 when scattered homesteads and farmland occupied the area. The area developed through 1953 with accelerated growth in the 1920s, when East Texas petroleum exploration began and the neighborhood was sought after by prosperous merchants and professionals. As the districts name implies, Tylers red brick streets run throughout the area and adds cohesiveness to the neighborhood. Click here to view the nomination! 
 
Copyright 2017 by City of Tyler