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Historic Preservation

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May is National Historic #PreservationMonth!

We’ll be highlighting Tyler’s historical resources, programs and incentives throughout the month. Here’s a brief history lesson about Tyler.

 5/26/20: Half Mile of History Program

HMOH

The Half Mile of History is a permanent, outdoor, half-mile loop that surrounds the square in the heart of downtown Tyler. Stone plaques will be placed in the sidewalk along the Half Mile of History to commemorate significant people, places or events.

The nominee’s contribution to the history of the community must have been made no fewer than 25 years ago. Possible areas that nominees may have contributed to could include, but are not limited to, agriculture, architecture, arts/culture, aviation, business, community service, education, entertainment/media, industry, invention/innovation, law, medicine, oil/gas, philanthropy, religion, science, sports and transportation.

https://www.cityoftyler.org/government/departments/development-services/plans/planning/half-mile-of-history

 

5/22/20: Historic Preservation Myth of the Day

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Myth: The preservation ordinance will not allow me to alter or add on to my home.

Untrue. While a historic review may be required for your addition, the historical review standard specifically allows and encourages reinvestment into historic structures.

Want to learn more about the local landmark program and incentives? Contact the City of Tyler Planning Department at 903-531-1175 option 5!

5/21/20: Historic Preservation Myth of the Day

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Myth: New replacement windows are better and more energy efficient than old historic windows.

Untrue. Although some believe that new replacement windows are more efficient, this is misleading at best.

Want to learn more about the local landmark program and incentives? Contact the City of Tyler Planning Department at 903-531-1175 option 5!

5/20/20:  

Historic Preservation Myth of the Day

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Myth: Being listed on the National Register protects a building from being damaged or demolished.

Untrue. National Register listing does not offer protection to properties. However, local ordinances through local landmark designation do offer protection.

Want to learn more about the local landmark program and incentives? Contact the City of Tyler Planning Department at 903-531-1175 option 5!

#ThisPlaceMatters

5/19/20: Historic Preservation Myth of the Day

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Myth: The preservation ordinance restricts the interior design of my building.

Untrue. The interiors of properties are not regulated by the City of Tyler’s preservation ordinance.

Want to learn more about the local landmark program and incentives? Contact the City of Tyler Planning Department at 903-531-1175 option 5!

5/18/20: Historic Preservation Myth of the Day

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Myth: The preservation ordinance restricts what colors I can paint my building.

Untrue. Exterior colors are not regulated by the City of Tyler’s preservation ordinance.

Want to learn more about the local landmark program and incentives? Contact the City of Tyler Planning Department at 903-531-1175 option 5!

5/15/20: Tyler's Brick Streets

Watch the laying of the brick streets!

Tyler’s brick streets are one of the city’s most important historic assets. When people think of Tyler, many associate brick streets and historic districts with city identity. Most of Tyler’s existing brick streets are located in the Brick Streets, Azalea, and Charnwood National Register historic districts. Other brick streets can be found downtown and in portions of North Tyler (some of the oldest areas in Tyler). Most of historic brick streets were installed in the 1930’s and 1940’s as part of a Works Progress Administration (WPA) project. 

5/14/20: Tyler's Local Historic Overlay Districts

The City of Tyler has two local historic overlay districts: Heritage Neighborhoods No. 1 and No. 2!

A Historic District Overlay (HD-O) is intended to establish and preserve structures, sites or areas that have outstanding historical and cultural significance. It is not intended to limit the development of undeveloped lands.

Designation of a HD-O may be accomplished by ordinance of the City Council if ALL OF the following requirements are met:

  1. A petition to the Planning Department containing the signatures of at least 75% of the
    property owners located within the proposed HD-O; and
  2. A recommendation for approval by the Historical Preservation Board; and
  3. Favorable vote of a simple majority of the members of the City Council.

Click the images to view Heritage Neighborhood No. 1 and Heritage Neighborhood No. 2!

HeritageNo1

HeritageNo2

5/12/20: Tyler's Public Landmarks

PublicLandmarks

Did you know that the Oakwood Cemetery at 400 North Palace Avenue is the final resting place of many notable residents and pioneers including Governor Richard Hubbard, John Woldert, Rudolph Bergfeld, William Goodman, Senator Horace Chilton, and others?

Click the link below to view all of Tyler’s historical public and municipal sites and a brief description of their history and significance to Tyler’s heritage!

5/11/20: Tyler's Commercial Landmarks

CommercialLandmarks 

Did you know that when the People’s National Bank Building (now People’s Petroleum Building) at 102 North College Avenue was built in 1932, it was the tallest building west of the Mississippi River?

Click the link below to view all of Tyler’s historical commercial buildings and a brief description of their history and significance to Tyler’s heritage!

#ThisPlaceMatters

#PreservationMonth

5/8/2020: Tyler's Historic Districts

Did you know that Tyler has six residential areas listed in the National Register of Historic Places? The National Register of Historic Places is this nation’s official list of buildings, structures, sites and objects worthy of the preservation. The National Register is authorized under the National Historic Preservation of 1966. It is administered in Texas by the Texas Historical Commission. National Register designation is honorary and poses no restrictions on the use of property but provides significant financial benefits, including eligibility for the Federal Historic Preservation Tax Credits. Properties may be listed individually in the National Register or be included as part of a district within definable geographic boundaries.

 Azalea

Charnwood

DonnybrookDuplex

EastFerguson

ShortLine

#ThisPlaceMatters

#PreservationMonth

 5/7/2020: Tyler's Residential Landmarks

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Did you know that the Patterson House at 1311 West Oakwood Street was originally built in 1854 making it the oldest known home in Tyler still in existence? It was built by John Lollar who was one of the original Smith County Commissioners!

Click here to view all of Tyler’s historical homes and a brief description of their history and significance to Tyler’s heritage!

5/6/2020:  Local Historic Landmark Program

The City of Tyler is proud to have designated 132 properties as local historic landmarks! To be listed in the local landmark register, a structure needs to be at least 50 years old and have historical significance such as architectural style, previous resident of significance, important event, etc.

Did we mention that there is no cost to be listed as a local landmark? In fact, the City of Tyler offers a 50% tax abatement on the City’s portion of your tax bill!

View the infographic below to see other incentives. Contact us for more information!

#PreservationMonth

5/5/2020: Founding a “most pleasant place”

Tyler Postcard

Founded in 1846 when the Texas Legislature authorized the creation of Smith County, Tyler began as a 100-acre tract of land purchased for $150 from Edgar Pollitt, a local farmer. The original Smith County Commissioners were William Duncan, James Hill, Elisha Lott, John Lollar, and John Dewberry and they were tasked with locating the County seat in the “most pleasant place […] having elevation and good water.” In 1847, a twenty-eight acre town site was laid out around a central square. The new town was named after John Tyler, the eleventh president of the United States and flourished over the succeeding years, buoyed by cotton, railroads, fruit and roses.

By the 1920s, Tyler was well-known for its orchards and flowers, and when oil was discovered locally, the city experienced an economic boom that protected it from the Great Depression. Many of the city’s historic neighborhoods reflect the economic standing that Tyler enjoyed during this period.

Like many other cities, Tyler modernized as times changed after World War II. A desire to improve upon the old led to the replacement of many notable older buildings, such as the 1909 courthouse and the city square, the Blackstone Hotel, and the Citizens National Bank. As the city grew southward, some older areas in Tyler experienced disinvestment.

In an effort to preserve Tyler’s local history, the City of Tyler has adopted ordinances and incentives for landmark designation. The City also works with partner organizations such as Historic Tyler, Inc and Smith County Historical Society to collaborate on recognizing Tyler’s historical resources and preserving our local heritage!